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Green Tea as an Effective Health Drink

In the world where many diseases emerge every year, it is common for people to think about their health. This is why many companies are producing products that have potential health benefits for the consuming public. One of most marketed products today are health drinks that were derived from plants with soothing properties such as tea.

Tea itself is considered a health drink especially for the Chinese who have been using it for its medicinal benefits roughly 4,000 years ago. In some other countries where there is cold climate, tea is a very popular drink next to water. Basically, tea has four types: the black tea, the oolong tea, the green tea, and the white tea. Each of which is said to have benefits that can help the overall well being of a person.

Green tea’s secret

But among all these types, green tea stands out because many health drinks, beauty products, and even food make use of it. Experts say that the reason behind this demand for green tea is because it is rich catechin polyphenols—more specifically in “epigallocatechin gallate” or EGCG, which is a very powerful anti-oxidant.

Coming from the leaves of the plant called “camellia sinensis,” experts say that green tea is considered are superior among the rest because it processed in the very different way. Unlike other types of teas, which are obtained from fermented leaves, the leaves of green tea are steamed. This is to ensure that the EGCG will not be oxidized unlike in the fermentation process where the EGCG are converted into other forms complex compounds.

Healthy benefits

One of the reasons why people use healthy drinks and products that are derived from green tea is to maintain a healthy body that is away from diseases or illnesses.

Since green tea is believed to be the healthiest among other types of teas, people consume it to veer away from certain medical conditions or to cure existing health conditions such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, high cholesterol levels, cariovascular diseases, infections, tooth decay, and various impaired immune functions as well as help people to lose weight.

More and more people who are at risk with cancer and even those who are already suffering from the condition are using green tea as a health drink because of its high EGCG content. Experts believed that EGCG could inhibit the growth of cancer cells in the body by killing the cells without causing harm to other cells and tissues.

Many companies also use green tea in their products because EGCG itself can lower LDL cholesterol levels while inhibits “thrombosis,” the abnormal formation of blood clots in the body which are major causes cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke.

In the field of losing weight, more and more people are using green tea as a health drink because it is believed that the extract from the green tea is able to burn more calories compared to placebo or caffeine. For those who have dental concerns such as tooth decay, green tea can also help avoid this because it contains bacteria-destroying properties that kills the bacteria in plaque.

Although green tea has many proven benefits to people who use it as a health drink, experts still warn that it should be used in moderation. This is because green tea still contains caffeine, which can cause insomnia attacks to people who have low caffeine tolerance.

Green Tea Extract Increases Metabolism, May Aid in Weight Loss

Green Tea Extract Increases Metabolism, May Aid in Weight Loss

There are two ways to lose weight — either reduce energy intake, or increase energy expenditure. Because hypothyroidism — even after treatment — may reduce energy expenditure in some people, patients naturally are looking for options that can help safely help raise the metabolism.

In a study reported on in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, it was found that green tea extract resulted in a significant increase in energy expenditure (a measure of metabolism), plus also had a significant effect on fat oxidation. While some of the effects were originally theorized to be due to the caffeine content of green tea, the researchers discovered that the tea actually has properties that go beyond those that would be explained by the caffeine.

The same amount of caffeine as was in the green tea, administered alone, failed to change energy expenditure in other studies. This led reseachers to believe that there is some interaction going on with the active ingredients of green tea that promotes increased metabolism and fat oxidation.

The researchers indicated that their findings have substantial implications for weight control. A 4% overall increase in 24-hour energy expenditure was attributed to the green tea extract, however, the research found that the extra expenditure took place during the daytime. This led them to conclude that, since thermogenesis (the body’s own rate of burning calories) contributes 8-10% of daily energy expenditure in a typical cubject, that this 4% overall increase in energy expenditure due to the green tea actually translated to a 35-43% increase in daytime thermogenesis.

For more information visit: http://www.healthiertoday.net/greentea/

Green Tea Fights Fat

Green Tea Fights Fat

A new study has shown that drinking green tea may also fight fat.

The study showed that people who drank a bottle of tea fortified with green tea extract every day for three months lost more body fat than those who drank just a bottle of regular oolong tea.

Researchers say the results indicate that substances found in green tea known as catechins may trigger weight loss by stimulating the body to burn calories and decreasing body fat.

The findings appear in the January issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Green Tea: Fat Fighter?

Black tea, oolong tea, and green tea come from the same Camellia sinensis plant. But unlike the other two varieties, green tea leaves are not fermented before steaming and drying.

Most teas contain large amounts of polyphenols, which are plant-based substances that have been shown to have antioxidant, anticancer, and antiviral properties.

However, green tea is particularly rich in a type of polyphenols called catechins. These substances have also been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties, but recent research in animals show that catechins may also affect body fat accumulation and cholesterol levels.

In this study, researchers looked at the effects of catechins on body fat reduction and weight loss in a group of 35 Japanese men. The men had similar weights based on their BMI (body mass index, an indicator of body fat) and waist sizes.

The men were divided into two groups. For three months, the first group drank a bottle of oolong tea fortified with green tea extract containing 690 milligrams of catechins, and the other group drank a bottle of oolong tea with 22 milligrams of catechins.

During this time, the men ate identical breakfasts and dinners and were instructed to control their calorie and fat intake at all times so that overall total diets were similar.

After three months, the study showed that the men who drank the green tea extract lost more weight (5.3 pounds vs. 2.9 pounds) and experienced a significantly greater decrease in BMI, waist size, and total body fat.

In addition, LDL “bad” cholesterol went down in the men who drank the green tea extract.

The catechin content varies by amount of green tea used and steeping time. But general recommendations, based on previous studies on the benefits of green tea, are at least 4 cups a day. Green tea extract supplements are also available.

Researchers say the results indicate that catechins in green tea not only help burn calories and lower LDL cholesterol but may also be able to mildly reduce body fat.

“These results suggest that catechins contribute to the prevention of and improvement in various lifestyle-related diseases, particularly obesity,” write researcher Tomonori Nagao of Health Care Products Research Laboratories in Tokyo, and colleagues.

SOURCE: Nagao, T. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, January 2005; vol 81: 122-129.

For more information visit: green tea website